The Work of Longtime ‘New Yorker’ Illustrator Bruce McCall is the Embodiment of Nostalgia

The New Yorker shared its latest cover earlier this month, illustrated by none other than longtime art contributor Bruce McCall. The Canadian-born artist has been working in the field for over 60 years, beginning his illustration career drawing cars for Ford Motor Company in Toronto back in the 1950s. After several decades working in advertising, he sought new opportunities in the publishing industry and moved to New York City.

The latest cover explores the illustrator’s distaste for the escalating skyline in his home city, which threatens the youth culture of the region.

McCall has illustrated dozens of magazine covers, regularly appearing on the cover of The New Yorker since becoming a contributor back in 1980. With his latest November 2016 cover, McCall has created his 71st cover for the mainstay publication. Futuristic, yet highly nostalgic, the cover showcases what appears to be a monstrously high skyscraper with eyes on their televisions in front of them – an American Eagle at the forefront.

With context, the latest cover explores the illustrator’s distaste for the escalating skyline in his home city, which threatens the youth culture of the region. “All the new high-rises along the Williamsburg side of the East River, aimed at the sunset, are thrilling to live in, I’m sure,” Bruce explains. “But they will help turn Williamsburg into a seedy Brooklyn version of Second Avenue. Combined with the loss of the L train, this is a blow to a vibrant young culture and another threat to civilized middle-class living anywhere near the city.”

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