“Spinning is a sport where you go around in circles with a car, like the car is moving sideways,” explains Stacey Lee May, the unofficially dubbed “Spinning Princess” of Soweto, South Africa. The small township found within SA’s Johannesburg city isn’t a likely place where you would imagine the almost-gangster like sport of spinning to be well rooted and thriving—the open streets of LA seems a more likely fit (and it actually is a place where this goes down).

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“I just want to show you that the sky’s the limit. You don’t have to be stuck in a box.”

However the sport is prevalent in Soweto, and more than that, the locals have gone and twisted things up in their own way. If cranking down on the hand break to whip your vehicle into a spinning frenzy wasn’t dangerous enough, throw in as many stunts as you possible can—from hanging full bodied out the window, to surfing mid-spin on the hood, to clambering all the way out just to find an opening to jump back in—in the name of fun. While Spinning is more of a male dominated sport in Soweto, Stacey Lee May is not letting that stop her from showing the audience who’s boss. Coming from a family of spinners, Lee May has it in her blood, and it clearly shows from her brazen, daredevil take on the action.

The sport also offers Lee May, and many others we’re sure, an activity that pulls them away from the wrong side of the road. As Stacey puts it, “I’m out of trouble, more at east with my family. My parents know what I’m doing and they don’t have to stress and worry.” That being said, the thought of your daughter jumping back into a spinning hunk of metal is, well… a little worrying. In any event, check out the Vice produced short video documentary about the culture and Stacey Lee May, directed by Nick Ahlmark in the jump above.