Alexander Lendrum

Editorial curator, born and raised in Hong Kong

Slideshow /

Relive The Golden Age Of Gaming With This Photo Series That Captures The Pinnacle Of ’80s Arcades

As we move steadfast into a whole new level—or dimension rather—of gaming, with immersive Virtual Reality being the next obvious stage for digital entertainment, we leave behind in a trail of dust the inventions of old that once held the title for being revolutionary. Much like in Toy Story, Wall-E and all the likewise animation stories, these old, battered and almost extinct gaming platforms are sulking away even further into the darkness of our memories.

the-golden-age-of-video-arcades-photo-series-5

The late ’70s to early ’80s—which was considered the golden age for video games—was a time when arcade arenas were the go-to for a spot of gaming fun.

So in a bid to not have them disappear for good among the sea of millennials who probably have never had the pleasure of bashing buttons while frantically maneuvering a joystick, we’re showcasing a photo series that celebrates the gaming world of the good ol ’80s. The late ’70s to early ’80s—which was considered the golden age for video games—was a time when arcade arenas were the go-to for a spot of gaming fun. A place lined with flashing lights pixelated characters dancing to cascade of beeps and boops. While this thankfully still exists in your local hipster barcade, the crowd of overly-dressed drunkards you see today was once a thriving and social scene of all-ages, from pre-teens to the middle-ages, all passionate in their pursuit to bunk the current high scorer off the chart.

the-golden-age-of-video-arcades-photo-series-2

Thanks to Timeline photography editor Rian Dundon, we have before us a series of images that captures the essence of this golden era of gaming. Pulled from several sources that showcases scenes from around the U.S., The Golden Age of Video Arcades is a nostalgic trip that will help relive some of those old memories, or spark inspiration and imagination for those too young, to never forget where gaming came from.

Alexander Lendrum

Editorial curator, born and raised in Hong Kong