Baggy pants and oversized tees are for anyone that lived during the late eighties and throughout the nineties a memory of either sheer embarrassment, or pining nostalgia. Heck, even if you weren’t around yet during those golden years, the plethora of new brands that attempt to mimic the street-centric look and feel of those yesteryears will have you know what we’re talking about. But while the parachute pants, brightly colored overalls, and XL tie-die T-shirts were abound on the streets, school yards and, well… pretty much everywhere back then, the epitome of ’90s fashion can be best seen on the slopes.

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For all the skate and snowboard videos back then, pros often chose the music for their parts, which in turn inspired young skaters and snowboarders to look up the music.

Snowboarding culture during those times can be argued as the safe haven for going extreme when it came to experimenting with street-inspired fashion, and what certainly helped was the fact that the sport had hit mainstream by then. Sure skateboarding still reigned supreme, but snowboarding became this new alternative that attracted a new wave of youth, most of which brought with them a fashion sensibility that stemmed mainly from both grunge and hip hop passions.

Chronicling this, New York-native Alex Dymond—who comes with designer fame with brands like Burton and Supreme—has released a photobook dubbed Snow Beach: Snowboarding Style 86-96. It’s a comprehensive look at the sport’s youth, or “tribe” like culture during that time period, and how things became the way they did in terms of the scene’s aesthetic that blurs the lines between sports, fashion and music. “Music is a real defining factor in those formative years. For all the skate and snowboard videos back then, pros often chose the music for their parts, which in turn inspired young skaters and snowboarders to look up the music,” Dymond tells i-D of the subculture. If you’re interested to know more, you can grab the book now at powerHouse Books for $40 USD.