As the title suggests, California plays home to one of America’s largest cumulative group of rocket ship enthusiasts. That’s right: rocket ships. And no, we’re not talking about a group of kids banding together after school to shoot carbonated bottle-rockets up into the rooftops of their houses. We’re talking about fully grown adults (as well as kids of course) with some seriously professional fire powered rockets that will knock out an unsuspecting bird straight out of the sky. Every once in a while, rocket enthusiasts of all skill levels from all over amass together in the deserts of California – this particular event being at Lucerne Dry Lake – to shoot their own ships way up into the sky.

For us to be able to witness such a spectacle, Los Angeles-based photographer Sean Lemoine, who studied crime scene photography at the University of California Riverside, headed out to document the event, resulting in an impressively captivating series of images of people young and old carrying out, setting up and firing gigantic professional-grade home-made rockets. The project itself which Lemoine has dubbed LDRS, which stands for “Large Dangerous Rocket Ships,” was actually an exercise for the photographer to expand on his ability to create short-term focused documentation. “I had developed a curiosity concerning the subject and wanted to utilise the five-day event as an educational exercise in short-term focused documentation” Lemoine explains.

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It’s an odd yet brilliant scene looking at an elderly couple wade through the arid desert with a sleek 2-meter long rocket ship precariously placed over the shoulder.

Shot the midst of daytime, the images for LDRS showcases the sun-soaked beauty of these streamlined machines as they soar up and float down. But what’s even more interesting are the people behind the activity. The everyday towns folk of all ages and sex. It’s an odd yet brilliant scene looking at an elderly couple wade through the arid desert with a sleek 2-meter long rocket ship precariously placed over the shoulder. Check out our highlights from Sean Lemoine’s LDRS series throughout the post, and be sure to click here to see more of his work.