Alexander Lendrum

Editorial curator, born and raised in Hong Kong.

Capturing the Radiance of Cuba’s Pastime Obsession With Watching Old TV Sets

Different countries from around the world have their own favorite pastimes. For Japan, it’s baseball, in the UK it’s shopping, and in America, it’s watching television. Cuba also happens to share the same number one hobby as America, taking on the ol box as its pastime vessel, which something photographer Simone Lueck discovered during her time there on a two-week trip away from her usual schedule that takes her between Minneapolis and New York. “Each time I came across an open door and a working TV set, I would ask if I could take a picture of it. The answer was always yes, nobody seemed to think it was an odd request, and it was usually accompanied by a Cuban coffee or rum,” Lueck tells Hunger magazine of her series.

But while American’s strive for that super wide-screened, ultra-high definition piece of technology, Cubans have been contempt with the awesomely retro and outdated set. And because of that, the images from Leuck’s series, dubbed Cuba TV, have been graced with a poetic radiance, emitted through the screens of these old TV sets, lighting up Cuba’s old cozy homes. “The TV sets themselves are outdated, pre-revolution relics imported from America or sets from Russia over twenty years old; green-hued beasts jimmy-rigged with ancient parts and fantastically adorned like religious altars,” Leuck adds on her experience. Check out the images from Simone Lueck’s Cuba TV series throughout, then head over to Hunger’s website for the original article, but not before following Lueck on Instagram here.

Alexander Lendrum

Editorial curator, born and raised in Hong Kong.